Menlo Church & John Ortberg - Child-Attracted Volunteer Allowed In Youth Ministry

ortberg timeline
February 13, 2020

My church, Menlo Church, has been in the news, and not in a good way. In brief, the senior pastor, John Ortberg, found out about a person attracted to children and failed to prevent this person from working in the children’s ministry—or worse than that, encouraged the person in working with kids, according to the whistleblower, Danny Lavery.

I have attended Menlo Church for over ten years, which means I have been listening to John Ortberg’s sermons for that long. I don’t know John personally, though I have seen him around, and there was that one time our A/V equipment was on the fritz and John drove down to deliver the sermon in person. I was married at Menlo. I know there are many good people at the church.

But I also know what it looks like when church senior leadership isn’t being forthright.

I understand the desire to avoid pointing to troubling information, but I believe everyone, including the church, is best served by having all the assertions out in the open. This post is a chronological account of what has happened, as best I can piece it together.

Last updated: Mar 4, 2020.

Persons of interest

Timeline

July 2018

John and Nancy Ortberg were approached by a person who was sexually attracted to children. In their respective accounts, the Menlo Church elder board and Danny Lavery emphasized different parts of this incident.

The Menlo Church elder board described this meeting in a Jan 21, 2020 email as follows:

In July of 2018, a person serving in the Menlo Church community came to John and shared in confidence an unwanted thought pattern of attraction to minors. The person assured to John’s satisfaction, that the person had not acted on the attraction and sought John’s support. John believed the person and provided prayers and referrals for counseling. However, John failed to take the required steps to prevent the person from volunteering with minors at the Menlo Park campus and did not consult anyone else at Menlo Church about the situation.

Compare to Daniel Lavery’s Feb 2, 2020 statement posted to Twitter:

On November 15, 2019 a member of the congregation at Menlo Church disclosed to me that for most of their life, they had experienced obsessive sexual feelings about young children. This person further disclosed that they had sought out unsupervised volunteer positions with children as a method of treating this obsession, including volunteer work at Menlo Church as well as volunteer work that involves overnight travel with minors. Lastly, this person disclosed that although they had never spoken to a therapist about this plan, they had shared it with John and Nancy Ortberg in July 2018. John Ortberg has continually encouraged this person in their pursuit of unsupervised work with children.

It appears this conversation was kept secret from everyone at the time. At the March 1 town hall Q&A, John revealed that he had sought counsel from a psychologist and a psychiatrist without identifying the volunteer.

Nov 15, 2019

Daniel Lavery says he discovered the situation and confirmed the information with his father, John Ortberg. Daniel described the conversation as follows:

That same day, my wife Grace and I confirmed all the above with John Ortberg. We expressed the gravest reservations about this scheme, but were told (1) that pedophilia was like homosexuality; (2) that the most important thing was maintaining secrecy around this affair; (3) that we lacked standing to offer an alternative form of treatment for sexual obsessions with children because of our transitions. John could not offer credible reassurance when I asked whether this person had stopped traveling overnight with children, even though John claimed the two of them had spoken often and candidly. “I’m not sure,” he said.

The elder email omitted this incident.

Nov 18, 2019

Daniel Lavery says he wrote to the volunteer and his father, John Ortberg:

On November 18th, I wrote to the person in question with the names of therapists specializing in work with pedophiles who want to avoid harming children. I encouraged them to seek treatment, and to resign all volunteer positions working with children, which they did. My wife and I also wrote to my father, encouraging him to disclose every aspect of this affair to the elders at Menlo Church. He did not.

The elder email omitted this incident.

Nov 21, 2019

Daniel Lavery reported the situation to Menlo Church:

On November 21st we made full report of the above to multiple employees and elders at Menlo Church. The following day John Ortberg went on unspecified “personal leave” from his pastoral duties.

Nov 22, 2019

The Menlo Church elder board had an emergency meeting to discuss Daniel’s complaint. The Board authorized Beth Seabolt and/or David Kim to acquire legal counsel for the remainder of the process. The Board authorized Beth Seabolt and/or Russ Hall to acquire a private investigator.1

John Ortberg went on personal leave. According to the Menlo Church elder board:

John’s personal leave was suggested by the Elder Board (Session), and followed the Board’s need to investigate concerns raised by a third party.

Beth Seabolt wrote to Danny Lavery:

I cannot imagine how difficult it must have been for you to raise this issue, knowing that the family members you love would be impacted. We appreciate the care you put into thoughtfully crafting the detailed account.

~Nov 25, 2019

The Menlo Church elder board reported the incident to ECO (the denomination the church is part of):

As soon as these concerns were brought to the Board’s attention, the Board acted immediately and consistent with Menlo Church policy, informed our denomination (ECO) and retained an independent investigator to look into the matter.

Nothing was announced to the church congregation at this time.

Mid-late November

From the congregation’s perspective, John had been scheduled to give a sermon, but it kept getting postponed.

Nov 28, 2019

Daniel Lavery posted a public newsletter discussing his sudden estrangement from the Ortberg family and alluding to what had happened:

I on the other hand, was caught completely off guard. Two weeks ago I learned something I could not live with – asked what had been done about it – learned that nothing had been done, nor would ever – was chided for suggesting it was, in fact, morally necessary to take action immediately – estrangement from my family of origin, which had the day before been the furthest thing from my mind, became a matter of the keenest urgency.

In the last week, I have been able to hastily rewrite the portions of my book concerning my family of origin, and have taken Grace’s last name – feeling, I think quite naturally, a little tired of how many times I have changed my name in the last two years. I have made choices I know I can live with, choices that prioritize loving accountability over secrecy, and encouraged my family of origin to do the same.

~Dec 1-2

The investigator hired by Menlo Church began his investigation2. Very little has been released about this, not even the investigator’s name. However, the name was leaked online – the investigator is apparently Fred Alvarez of Coblentz Law. The official statement I received from Menlo Church on Feb 4 was:

A third-party investigator had full, independent license to pursue misconduct information related to our shared concerns and conducted as thorough a process as deemed necessary. Based on that investigation, interviews with supervising staff across Student’s and Children’s ministries, and a review of detailed volunteer records, the Board has not found any misconduct in the Menlo Church community, and the investigation did not reveal any allegations of misconduct. As the investigation was led by a third-party, and due to the subject matter of the investigation, further details are confidential at this point.

Dec 3

The elder board had a regularly scheduled meeting. John was not present. The agenda involved an update on the investigation and the response from the presbytery, which were redacted. I was told that the presbytery’s response was to delegate investigation of the complaint to the Menlo Church Session and that they asked to be updated on the investigation progress, which they were.1

Dec 11, 2019

Menlo’s December newsletter included a brief snippet mentioning that John was on personal leave, unrelated to illness:

This year, our Christmas message will be from Eugene Lee, our Executive Pastor of Campuses. Our senior pastor, John Ortberg, is on personal leave. He is not ill, and we ask that you join us in praying for him and our church family. While John is out, the work of the church continues under the leadership of our Session and Central Leadership Team.

There was no indication at this time that the leave was related to an investigation or requested by Session. No further details were given.

Mid December (?), 2019

Sometime before Christmas - I don’t remember the exact date - the elder board met again. The update on the investigation was that a written report would be coming soon.1 Note: does this mean the investigator concluded the interview portion of his investigation in only a few weeks?

Jan 14(?), 2020

In mid-January (exact date unsure), the Elder Board met again and discussed what appears to be the investigation results. At this meeting, the board decided that John should be allowed to begin a restoration plan.1

Jan 16, 2020

Beth Seabolt wrote to Danny Lavery:

Thank you again for bringing this situation to our attention. We greatly appreciate your concern for the Menlo Church community and commitment to doing what is right.

Also on the 16th, the Board met and discussed whether “this new information” (unspecified) changed anything about their previous decision. It did not. They called John in to inform him of the decision. They also decided that they would communicate with the complainant (Daniel Lavery) on Jan 20, the church staff on Jan 21, and the congregation on Jan 22. (Seems like that last one ended up accelerated.)1

Jan 21, 2020

On Jan 21, Menlo Church sent out a church-wide email announcing the results of the investigation and John’s return from personal leave:

We wanted to provide an update as it relates to John Ortberg.

As you might be aware, John has been on personal leave since November 22. John’s personal leave was suggested by the Elder Board (Session), and followed the Board’s need to investigate concerns raised by a third party. In July of 2018, a person serving in the Menlo Church community came to John and shared in confidence an unwanted thought pattern of attraction to minors. The person assured to John’s satisfaction, that the person had not acted on the attraction and sought John’s support. John believed the person and provided prayers and referrals for counseling. However, John failed to take the required steps to prevent the person from volunteering with minors at the Menlo Park campus and did not consult anyone else at Menlo Church about the situation.

The Board takes these concerns very seriously and believes the bond of trust around our children’s safety is among our highest callings as a Menlo Church community. As soon as these concerns were brought to the Board’s attention, the Board acted immediately and consistent with Menlo Church policy, informed our denomination (ECO) and retained an independent investigator to look into the matter. Based on that investigation, interviews with supervising staff across Student’s and Children’s ministries, and a review of detailed volunteer records, the Board has not found any misconduct in the Menlo Church community, and the investigation did not reveal any allegations of misconduct. Nevertheless, the investigation showed John exhibited poor judgment that was inconsistent with his responsibilities as Senior Pastor.

John fully understands the Board’s concerns regarding his handling of this situation. John is saddened by the potential risk he now realizes he brought on the Menlo community and wholly agrees that he did not handle this matter consistent with his responsibilities to Menlo Church and the Board’s expectations of him. He deeply apologizes for his action and decisions, and is committed to the safety and integrity of our community and to ensuring that such a situation does not arise again.

The safety and integrity of our community is of paramount importance at Menlo Church, and we hold all members of our community, especially Menlo Church staff, to the highest ethical standards. The Board’s role includes setting expectations for Menlo’s pastors and staff, and in holding them, including John, accountable. This includes ensuring that their actions and decisions are consistent with Menlo Church policies, as well as those of our denomination, ECO. The Board is ultimately accountable to ensure that the right safeguards are in place and that the operational policies and actions of Menlo Church staff are consistently followed. We believe we took timely action consistent with our policies and will continue to demonstrate great care and governing oversight.

Should any reports of abuse or misconduct surface at a later date, we are prepared to take immediate action with law enforcement and are fully aware of our obligations as mandatory reporters. We are also reviewing our protective measures for children. We have significant protective measures already in place, including the two adult policy and background checks for all regular volunteers. In the coming days, we will communicate those measures to you directly as well as to share any improvements we make. Please know if you ever witness or experience any kind of inappropriate conduct or wish to report something, you can confidentially contact Beth Seabolt at Elders@Menlo.Church. Also, if you are a parent seeking resources for how to discuss these difficult topics with your child, please contact Sue Kim-Ahn in Central Ministries.

Our shared beliefs are among what bind us together at Menlo Church. Among our core beliefs is God’s Redemptive Plan – that we believe God does not intend for sin and suffering to get the last word, but is at work to redeem and reconcile what He has made, with the affirmation that “everybody’s welcome, nobody’s perfect, and with God anything is possible.” To that end, and based on the Board’s investigation and careful deliberation, the Board has adopted a specific restoration plan setting John’s return from personal leave on Friday, January 24th. John will only be working internally with staff and the Board during this interim period, focusing on his restoration plan and seeking to rebuild trust. We hope for his return to the pulpit in the near future, if approved by the Board after closely monitoring John’s progress. John will share a brief word on these matters with the congregation this weekend.

In the midst of this matter, our commitment to our vision remains firm: to help people find and follow Jesus. We invite you to join us in continuing to pray.

Beth Seabolt
Elder Board Chair,
on behalf of Session

The overall impression given was that John had met with a person attracted to minors once, about a year and a half ago, and referred this person to counseling, but failed to file the paperwork with the church to prevent the person from volunteering. The email did not specify whether the “minors” involved were children or teenagers. It did not specify whether the volunteer was working with the age range he or she had a problem with.

The email claimed that the Board had “retained an independent investigator to look into the matter.” It did not say who was retained. According to the email, the investigation included “interviews with supervising staff” and “a review of detailed volunteer records” and did not reveal any “misconduct” or allegations of misconduct. John’s actions were summed up as “poor judgment that was inconsistent with his responsibilities as Senior Pastor.”

The email announced that starting January 24, John would be working internally for an interim period on a “restoration plan” and “seeking to rebuild trust.” It concluded, “We hope for his return to the pulpit in the near future, if approved by the Board after closely monitoring John’s progress. John will share a brief word on these matters with the congregation this weekend.”

Also on the 21st, Beth Seabolt wrote to Danny Lavery:

I can see how my earlier email might not have addressed all your concerns and I’d like to share more details with you. This has been a challenging time for us all, and the entire Board shares your deep concern as it relates to these issues.

The press did not pick up the story at the time.

Jan 25 & 26, 2020

John Ortberg spoke briefly before the sermon at Menlo Church on Saturday night. Menlo Church has a multi-site model where the Saturday night service is recorded and the video played at each campus for Sunday services.

Audio posted by Julie Roys on SoundCloud:

I want to talk from my heart to our church family for a few moments. You’ve got, you know, that email from our elders this week that describes how I made a ministry decision about a volunteer’s participation that I should not be. And when I did this, I failed to meet our church’s important and appropriate standards and failed to meet my responsibilities as a leader of our church. And this lacked transparency and collaboration and wisdom. And because I failed in this way, it has placed a burden on many people. And I want to take a moment to acknowledge that.

I think of everybody who is a parent, whose greatest nightmare is, “What if something should happen to my child?” I’m a parent of three children that I dearly love, and I know that fear. I think of people who have experienced the evil of abuse, or molestation, or violation, and the shame and pain that can wound a soul. I think of people who wrestle with secret, unwanted thoughts and wonder, “Is there a safe place where I can get help?” I think of all of our staff and our volunteers who serve so diligently. Menlo has one of the best and safest ministries I know, especially for young people, and I deeply regret my actions contributed to that being questioned instead of being celebrated.

So I have said this to the elders, and I have begun to say it to our staff, but now I want to say it to each one of you: I am so very sorry. I’m sorry I failed to do the right thing and I’m sorry for the weight and the burden this has created for so many. I’m beginning now a restoration plan that is designed and overseen by our elders to seek to rebuild trust and repair relationships with staff and elders and our congregation. And this is an elder decision. They will monitor it and evaluate it. But it’s important for you to know, I think it’s a very good thing. It has to be a robust, unhurrying process where staff and elders and others have great freedom to ask every question and seek discernment.

You all know church ministry can only be done if there’s a community of trust and transparency at its core. And if that can be rebuilt and restored, we will all move into the future together. And if it’s the best sense of our elders, with staff and congregation input, that it cannot then we will move into the future, trusting that God is guiding all of us in exactly the right way. For my part, my clear desire is to remain here and to serve at Menlo Church as best I can. Paul said, “When I am weak, then I am strong.” I believe God can use weakness and brokenness to build deeper and more honest and more real community.

I’ve already started talking with the elders about the future, and that, if and only if the restoration process leads in this direction, I think I can contribute to our church best by focusing most on preaching and teaching and spiritual formation and to have our elders and staff look at how we might find additional help in real important areas like strategic excellence and managerial leadership. I think our current challenge is one of the indicators of how much our church could benefit from greater strength in those areas than what I bring.

So I want to ask everybody to join me, to please be in prayer. Sometimes churches don’t respond well in moments like this. People get divided or they split into factions and then the unity and harmony and beauty of the church is threatened. And we know God doesn’t want that. This is not a human organization. This is the body of Christ. Know that our elders have been praying and working tirelessly the last few months to discern God’s will. Know that our staff has been bearing an extraordinary burden of concern and pressure and added weight. So this is a real important time for me and for a lot of us to be our very best selves, as God enables us: humble, confident, truthful, courageous, filled with love. And there’s no way we can do that without God, so would you pray with me.

John said that he “made a ministry decision about a volunteer’s participation” that he should not have and which failed to meet the church’s standards. He said, “I deeply regret my actions contributed to [the safety of Menlo’s children’s ministries] being questioned.” He apologized generally to the congregation and staff, saying, “I’m sorry I failed to do the right thing and I’m sorry for the weight and the burden this has created for so many.”

John said he was beginning a “restoration plan” overseen by the elder board in order to “rebuild trust” and “repair relationships.” He emphasized that it was not yet known whether he would return to his position but said his desire was to remain at Menlo, and he had already started talking to the elders about focusing his future work on “preaching and teaching and spiritual formation” while finding someone else to help in strategic/managerial areas.

He exhorted the church to remain unified, saying, “Sometimes churches don’t respond well in moments like this. People get divided or they split into factions and then the unity and harmony and beauty of the church is threatened. And we know God doesn’t want that.”

Feb 2, 2020

Daniel Lavery posted a statement on Twitter, saying that parishioners and journalists had reached out to him asking to understand the church’s response better:

Originally posted as screenshots on Twitter, Feb 2, 2020:

On November 15, 2019 a member of the congregation at Menlo Church disclosed to me that for most of their life, they had experienced obsessive sexual feelings about young children. This person further disclosed that they had sought out unsupervised volunteer positions with children as a method of treating this obsession, including volunteer work at Menlo Church as well as volunteer work that involves overnight travel with minors. Lastly, this person disclosed that although they had never spoken to a therapist about this plan, they had shared it with John and Nancy Ortberg in July 2018. John Ortberg has continually encouraged this person in their pursuit of unsupervised work with children.

That same day, my wife Grace and I confirmed all the above with John Ortberg. We expressed the gravest reservations about this scheme, but were told (1) that pedophilia was like homosexuality; (2) that the most important thing was maintaining secrecy around this affair; (3) that we lacked standing to offer an alternative form of treatment for sexual obsessions with children because of our transitions. John could not offer credible reassurance when I asked whether this person had stopped traveling overnight with children, even though John claimed the two of them had spoken often and candidly. “I’m not sure,” he said.

On November 18th, I wrote to the person in question with the names of therapists specializing in work with pedophiles who want to avoid harming children. I encouraged them to seek treatment, and to resign all volunteer positions working with children, which they did. My wife and I also wrote to my father, encouraging him to disclose every aspect of this affair to the elders at Menlo Church. He did not. On November 21st we made full report of the above to multiple employees and elders at Menlo Church. The following day John Ortberg went on unspecified “personal leave” from his pastoral duties.

I have no firsthand knowledge of any criminal activity, and I have real compassion for anyone trying to treat sexual compulsions with accountability and oversight. But the situation they had created was risky, unsafe, and unsustainable.

Menlo Church has recently issued a statement regarding John Ortberg’s “personal leave” from pastoral duties since November 22, 2019. They report that he “exhibited poor judgment that was inconsistent with his responsibilities,” but that “the investigation did not reveal any allegations of misconduct.” John Ortberg has offered a non-specific apology despite Menlo Church’s assertion that no one has done anything wrong. Parishioners and journalists have reached out to me, asking me to explain this apparent contradiction. I cannot.

As a non-churchgoer, I have no position on what an appropriate ecclesiastical response might be, and I’m not aware of the full scope of the investigation. This has been personally devastating, and broken the trust that once existed between myself and the Ortberg family. I have no further public statements to make at this time.

Danny Lavery

For the first time, the congregation became aware of the full extent of Daniel’s report to the church. According to Daniel:

The story was then picked up by multiple news sources, including RNS/Christianity Today, The Daily Mail, and local news.

Feb 6, 2020

Daniel Lavery posted Thoughts on a Phone Call, which described his experience of the Nov 15, 2019 phone call between himself and John Ortberg using a format that included paraphrased lines from John Ortberg (identifying information removed) interspersed with commentary from Daniel.

Daniel wrote that John pushed strongly for allowing the volunteer to work with children secretly, alternately cajoling and demanding he keep the secret. Daniel said John went to the extent of implying the volunteer’s suicide would be Daniel’s responsibility if he told the church:

Daniel also indicated that the volunteer did not follow John’s referrals for therapy, and that John knew it and allowed the situation to continue anyway:

Feb 27, 2020

Menlo Church sent out a congregation-wide email announcing John’s imminent completion of his restoration plan and return to the pulpit:

DEAR MENLO CHURCH COMMUNITY,

The Board of Elders met this week and we wanted to share an update based on our discussion.

We recognize these past few months have been challenging. Since our last update, John Ortberg has remained focused on his Restoration Plan and shown great progress. John has appropriately faced difficult discussions with congregants, volunteers, staff members, and elders. In each encounter, John has sought to understand the pain and concerns his actions have caused, apologized personally for his mistakes, offered to make amends where possible, and asked for help in restoring trust. We are pleased to hear the constructive and positive feedback John has received following his meetings. John has also reaffirmed his support for and compliance with Menlo Church’s key policies and beliefs as well as those of our denomination, ECO.

After thoroughly reviewing the input from all constituencies and considering the progressive nature of building trust, and after prayerfully seeking God’s guidance, the Board believes John is ready to move beyond his Restoration Plan and prepare for his return to the pulpit. The Board has full confidence in John as our spiritual leader and together we look forward to him preaching again starting the weekend of March 7 after being away from the pulpit since mid-November.

We will now also work together as a Board and at John’s request, to consider changes to responsibilities that will involve John focusing a greater portion of his time and gifts on teaching, discipleship, and mentorship while we discern alternative means to provide excellent day-to-day operational leadership for Menlo Church.

We are so proud of our dedicated staff and volunteers and the incredible care and diligence they bring to ensuring the safety and security of all who enter Menlo’s doors at every campus. We will continue to look for ways to further improve and maintain the highest standards in providing a safe, God-honoring environment. We will also continue to provide a community where those who face challenging issues can find a confidential way to receive spiritual support.

We are grateful for your trust and patience through this season. Your prayers and intercession for the church, the members of our congregation, our staff, our volunteers, our campus pastors, John and his family, and our surrounding communities have been, and continue to be deeply appreciated. We have seen God move in response to our prayers and are committed to being obedient to his call to reach the Bay Area for Christ. And now let’s look forward together to continuing our mission of helping people find and follow Jesus.

In Christ,

Beth Seabolt
Chair, Board of Elders

Mar 1, 2020

Menlo Church held a town hall meeting which consisted of brief updates from the elders, an update from a campus pastor, a guided prayer, and a Q&A. The updates were all positive and only briefly touched on the Ortberg situation by mentioning that his return would kick off an organizational restructuring at his request.

Most questions in the Q&A were about the pedophile situation. The elders did provide some new information: first, that the volunteer worked with middle and high schoolers; and second, that the volunteer had been working off and on for years. The investigator, they said, was “outstanding,” “very well-received, nationally,” and had worked in Washington. They said they would not be responding to Danny Lavery, who they said was “lashing out.” They asked the church to show grace to John and Nancy.

John spoke briefly and reiterated that while he did not believe there was reasonable suspicion of risk, he wished he had prevented the volunteer from working at Menlo because of how sensitive the subject is and how concerning it is to people. He said he had consulted a psychologist and a psychiatrist who agreed with him that the situation did not trigger mandatory reporting.

Full summary of questions & answers here, and my analysis here.

Mar 3, 2020

Grace Lavery posted a statement on Twitter and Daniel Lavery syndicated it on his newsletter.

The statement was a response to Beth Seabolt’s comments about Danny Lavery at the town hall on Mar 1. Grace said Beth should apologize for smearing Danny and for misleading the congregation. The statement included snippets of emails from Beth, showing how at the time, Beth never gave any indication to Danny that she considered his allegations non-credible. “Indeed, were it not for Danny’s ‘lashing out,'” Grace wrote, “neither she nor anyone at Menlo Church would even know that one of their volunteers believed themself to be treating their pedophilia with the explicit and sustained encouragement of the Ortbergs.”

Grace concluded:

In his own remarks at the Menlo Town Hall, John Ortberg acknowledged, albeit half-heartedly, that his secret plan to treat someone’s pedophilia by covert immersion therapy under his own supervision was a “mistake.” Does he therefore also regret attempting to bully Danny into keeping his secret? And if so, will he offer a public apology to his son? Do the Elders of Menlo Church not think that the absence of such an apology is quite disturbing, in this context?

Read the full statement here.

Mar 7, 2020

John gave his first sermon since November, “Lessons Learned on Leave." [Transcript]

Mar 8, 2020

The elder board hosted another Town Hall meeting. The content was similar to the first, although the mix of questions and answers was different. John reiterated several times that he did not believe the volunteer was or is or will be a risk to anybody. He also said that he “did not encourage a volunteer to seek to treat their condition by seeking unsupervised access with minors.”


Correction on 3/7: According to the Q&A on Mar 1, the volunteer worked with middle and high school students. Therefore, I have changed the title from “Kids Ministry” to “Youth Ministry”.

Thoughts on this post? Reply on Twitter.


  1. Some parts of this timeline are based on my memory of the elder board meeting minutes. Note-taking or duplicating the minutes is not allowed, so I’ve done my best to be accurate but I don’t have a source I can point you to. The minutes were heavily redacted on advice of counsel, and they were only for the board-wide meetings, not for the Ethical Misconduct Subcommittee, so there wasn’t much information. ↩︎

  2. I was told in private correspondence that the investigator began about 10 days after the complaint was received. ↩︎